How to Protect Your Brand on Facebook

Protect Your Brand on Facebook

Are you being selective and choosy about what you post and share on Facebook?  Does what you post match the overall values of your brand? 

When marketing on Facebook, it’s important to remember that you are your brand. What this means is that everything you say or post on Facebook reflects on your brand, either positively or negatively.

You’ve probably noticed that on Facebook, your personal interactions with your friends fall into a mixture of categories.  Some of the interactions are exceedingly honest, some post updates you can’t wait to read, and unfortunately, some will drain your energy because they always seem to be complaining about something.

It’s pretty safe to say that people who visit your page on Facebook want to have a positive experience. (On a side note though, I happen to think that being positive in life tends to allow a person to attract better things in life.)  However, even if you don’t share that belief, I can say with confidence that being positive on your Facebook page will impact your number of likes, your level of engagement, and the number of people who become paying customers significantly.

By and large, people want to enjoy their interaction on your page and to come away somehow improved by the experience. They may want to feel uplifted, informed, inspired, or experience any number of other positive benefits.  So when you post content, make sure to keep that in mind. Evaluate your content to make sure it won’t unintentionally offend, and that the result of what you have posted is that your fans will come away better somehow for having interacted with your page and your content.

Responding to Negative Posts On Your Page

Your Facebook page is yours. This means that you have the right to both monitor content posted as well as to remove content that does not reflect the mission and values of your brand. When people post negative or off-topic content, it’s as if they have walked into a physical store and started posting advertising for a competitor’s brand.

That said, there are occasions that you might choose to leave negative content posted.  A classic example is if someone posts a critique of your product or services. Some brands choose to remove such content. However, in some cases, this could suggest that the brand is less than fully transparent about its customer service practices. What I recommend you stay away from is getting involved in a flame war on your own page. It doesn’t matter how right you are, you will come out of it looking wrong.

Additionally, avoid responding to negativity with negativity. Find a professional way to respond – especially if it’s a post from someone complaining about a customer service issue. If you respond with courtesy and a desire to make the outcome right, more often than not, people will remember that vs. whatever the specific mistake might have been.

Have you ever had to deal with any difficult situations online?  How have you dealt with them?  I would love to hear your thoughts and experiences!

13 Comments

  1. I agree re: staying focused on the positive and even when someone wants to be negative to reframe it so the take away is still positive. I recently had someone who was posting very negative things about an event that I was participating in on my page and at first I engaged with the person in an effort to say "Hey, your experience with this particular promoter in the past may not have been the best but ours has always been great." When she continued to press, unfortunately, I had no choice but to block her from the page. We found out that she worked for a competing promoter so it was definitely the right decision. 

    Reply
  2. That is so true. This is your real estate and you don't have to allow people to throw garbage on it, but sometimes I have allowed the negative comments depending on what they were. If I get it, I do exactly what you say, I stay positive and courteous. Great post!

    Reply
  3. I've never had to deal with a difficult situation online, but you are spot on about how to deal with it. Staying positive or being the bigger person is going to move your brand a lot further then using negativity!

    Reply
  4. Excellent points throughout, Edmund. It's always wise to remember than when you sleep with dogs, you get up with fleas. Keep it positive and the vast majority of people will respond in the same fashion. 

    Reply
  5. I've always told my customers that to respond to the negativity kindly. To stay away from social media will hurt them more, because the negativity exists with or without social media. Better to be there to deal with it than to ignor it and let run rampant! 

    Reply
  6. Totally agree with this. Great information that people may not realize when posting on Facebook. It's about staying positive.

    Reply
  7. I couldn't agree more.  It's important to stay positive and professional.  Truly the best way.  When I see a negative post (which fortunately is very rare) I take a moment to relax. Then I choose a way respond with as much compassion as possible.

    Reply
  8. You've made some fabulous points, Edmund. I always try to keep my page positive and won't hesitate to hide or even delete and ban someone if I have to. It's not to be mean, it's to protect the rest of my community from having to read negative or mean comments. 😉 

    Reply
  9. I absolutely love this blog post ! Thanks for all of your timely tips.

    Reply
  10. If someone is posting a nevgative comment or a complaint and you answer just as negtively, it's a huge turn-off for current and potential clients. It's your choice to respond positively or negatively, but either way, your fans will question if that's they type of company they want to do business with. As the old saying goes, you can attract more flies with honey than vinegar.

    Reply
  11. Great article Edmund. I completely agree about the negativity. It's so easy to complain about things, but people don't enjoy listening to it and they develop very short attention spans. When you got groups of people doing it, like on Facebook, it can get a bit much. Definately steer clear!

    Reply
  12. I had a similar experience to Beth. It's best to address negative comments but sometimes there comes a point when all the commenters are fighting amonst themselves and the original point is "lost in translation".
     

    Reply
  13. Great advice! Indeed, there are far more benefits in responding in a professional way. What do you usually say when you respond in this situation?

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge